PROJECT 387

Artist Residency, Artist Community

Located on 150 acres of redwood forest, Project 387 provides a multidisciplinary residency program offering a community-based living and working experience for artists in all career stages. The residency is a unique opportunity to delve into the creative process in a focused, exploratory, and rigorous manner while removed from the clamor of urban distractions.

Meet Amanda Leigh Evans!

Learn more about Project 387 resident Amanda Leigh Evans' inspirations, processes, and work in the interview below!

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

At Project 387 I’ll be working on a set of ceramic dishes influenced by research on artists who have done work near Gualala. The work will look at the work of radical feminist potter/educator Marguerite Wildenhain and Anna + Lawrence Halprin’s RSVP Cycles.

I am constantly thinking about craft practices, the quotidian, and social practice. This summer I’ve spent a great deal of time researching the history of communal and radical movements on the west coast, particularly focusing on the 60’s and 70’s. I’m still digesting that research but feel it will have a long term effect on my work as I think about social practice and pedagogy.

Lately, I’ve also been very interested in scores and their capacity to all for simultaneous intuition and framing. Before I turned to art, I was really into music composition and made work heavily influenced by composers Terry Riley, Steve Reich, and Adam Rudolph. Using scores in my current practice allows that structure and rhythm to move back into my work.

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

  • Call Your Girlfriend - a podcast about feminism, pop culture, the internet, and friendship.
  • Wabi Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers by Leonard Koren - a book written about the imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete aesthetic ideal of wabi sabi.
  • Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism by Chris Jennings - a history of early American communes and radical culture in the 1800’s and early 1900’s.
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates - A beautifully written letter to a young black man about race in America. Toni Morrison calls it “required reading”.
  • Country Women magazine (not to be confused with Country Woman) - an out of print magazine published in the 70’s and 80’s with an incredible collection of rural radical feminist articles about art, farming, relationships, and back to the land movements.
What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

This really varies depending on the day and the project. Often, I am working on collaborative projects either with specific community groups or with other artists, so my practice involves a lot of correspondence and meetings. I relish the full studio days when I can sit quietly and work on my ceramic work without interruption. I see the studio as a space that defines all areas where the work is being created and I think it is important not to limit the definition of studio to a secluded space of production. To me, both types of work happen in my “studio”, but that space is fluid and expanded.

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst?

There have been a few times in my career where I have faced significant forks in the road and I had to choose between great but completely different options. When I had two good paths before me, I was difficult for me to determine what I really wanted or who, in my core, I really was. I would poll all of my mentors on their perspective and what I wanted was someone to just tell me which path was better and which I should choose. Of course, it doesn’t work like this. The best advice and support I received was from people who listened and helped me find myself in these decisions, rather than telling me which option they thought was the better deal.

I usually reject any advice that encourages me to be less tenacious or more conforming to traditional gender roles.

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

Yes! Just before Project 387 I’ll be a fellow Mildred’s Lane, I have a show opening in Portland in late July, and I have a book coming out with Fritz Haeg at some point on the history of Salmon Creek Farm. I’m also also working in a collaborative team to present a project on conversations about Race at the Art in Odd Places festival in NYC in October.

What are you most looking forward to at Project 387?

I am SO excited to have two weeks of concentrated, uninterrupted time to explore and synthesize this work that means so much to me but needed this concentrated, contextualized time in order for it to come into the world. I’m also very much looking forward to meeting the other residents and learning from their practices.

Meet Leah Rosenberg!

In our latest digital interview, artist Leah Rosenberg gives us some additional insights into her work from San Francisco. 

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days? 

I have an affinity for paint, color, stripes, flavor and the arrangement of these ingredients to create an experience over time.  My practice spans a range of media including painting, sculpture, installation, performance and how delight or expectation might someday be considered a medium too.

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

I have been reading interviews and looking at work by Agnes Martin, Felix Gonzales Torres and thinking a lot about what it means to work intuitively versus systematically.  Since working out of Kala, I have been thinking about editioning and multiples and how that could apply to something like cake.  Currently in my bag or on my nightstand are Yoko Ono’s Grapefruit, 1001 One Minute Stories from 1927 by H.S Chapman, Colours of our Memories by Michel Pastoreau (who also wrote The History of Stripes), and Daily Rituals by Mason Currey.  I love to know about people’s daily routines, so reading or listening to interviews fuels me.  Krista Tippett’s interview with Yo Yo Ma is a recent favorite.   

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

I don’t have a typical day in the studio, typically. My studio/office looks more like a whirling dervish scenario at the moment.  I’ve been doing more site specific installations and traveling to residencies which has allowed me to work in a larger scale and structure my projects around time and relate them to the space.

I am just finishing as a fellow at Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, so I have been commuting there to complete an accretive screen print and colorful collaboration with Christine Wong Yap.  I make stipe paintings and paint stacks in the garage of a shared home and will often paint a layer of color when I wake up, when I get home from a run, before I go to bed, so they end up being very much a record of what could be a typical daily routine. 

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst?

My main advisor in grad school came in to the studio one day.  We were talking about how to talk about the paintings I had been working on.  At the time, I was making cakes and bringing them to my painting critiques and he thought it was starting to get confusing, not helping the discussion and making the paintings too saccharine.  As he went on about how I should pick one, cake or painting, he made me a sign to wear around my neck for a period of time.  It read “No More CAKE”.  I went home that night with the sign around my neck and baked as many cakes as I could and then brought them to school the following morning and set up a table in front of the admin office.  When all the cakes were gone, the sign went out on the table and that was the end of cakes for me.  For a week.  I think that was the best/worst advice I’ve been given.  It gave me some distance and a chance to “just be a painter” and to realize the thing that was the most interesting to me was not to just make a painting to hang on a wall or to bake a cake that looks like art but what happens when you serve the two simultaneously.   

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

The Kala Fellow exhibition opens July 17th at Kala Art Institute.  A solo exhibition that will open at the end of September at the Kenderdine Gallery at the University of Saskatchewan in the city where I grew up.  A wall installation will soon be up at Workshop Residence in the Dogpatch --the result of a month-long residency. 

What are you most looking forward to at Project 387?

I look forward to the two weeks (a fortnight!) of finding colors in the early mornings and late afternoons, taking the same walks twice.  A bonus will be getting to know the other artists in residence around the table at dinner, being inspired by their process, and to hopefully get some feedback on some ideas I am working on involving language around color.  I also look forward to what comes after/from these two weeks of focused time working in a new place.

 

Meet Kim Miskowicz!

In our latest electronic interview, Kim Miskowicz tells us more about what "Place" means to her and her project. Read on to learn more! 

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?  

I am currently exploring interruptions of idealized place, either physical location or emotional place.  Place, for me, is personal.  Place is the setting of every moment I want to remember.  A large portion of my video archive was shot knowing what time of day and season to capture places I spend most of my time either on a hike in the Bay Area, from my studio window in downtown Oakland, or visiting family in New Mexico.  Another portion of footage is from desperate attempts to hold onto memories of vacations where I shoot whatever I can to gather image references that I might want to remember or use in the future.  These shots often have interruptions of the place I attempt to capture, such as a crowded composition of a park designated scenic lookout, or audio of summer sounds of crickets and cicadas at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon interrupted by the starting of a car.  It is the interrupted moments in special places that I want to explore at Project 387.  

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

I follow a London artist Theo Tagholm on Vimeo whose experimentation with video and landscape is inspiring.  I recently enjoyed seeing Wim Wenders’ early short films at the BAMPFA and follow new developments in storytelling with Virtual Reality ever since reading an essay by Andrew Marantz, “Studio 360.”  I intake a well-balanced diet of serious and amusing media; recently Paul Bogard’s book, The End of Night,  Eric Schlosser’s Command and Control, and new flash fiction by Kara Vernor.  I listen to countless comedy, pop culture and educational podcasts, not specific to current projects, but undoubtedly indirectly influencing my state of mind.

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

I have 4-5 hours/day to work in the studio.  My studio is across the street from a playground in a congested area of downtown Oakland where there is a lot of street noise from kids playing, cars honking and fighting for parking. My space is filled with obsolete digital and analog cameras, editing equipment, projectors, books, papers, half-finished projects, sewing machines, older work and the art of others.  I walk into my studio around 7am, look at notes to myself from where I left off either from video editing or a landscape collage, load a podcast and start working for a few hours. If working on a collage I spend time cutting, gluing and stepping back to check the composition.  When working on a moving image project I have my hands in multiple formats playing with Super 8mm, miniDV, camera phone videos and scanned textures from my sketchbook.  If I have a moment, I will check if there are any films showing that week at BAMPFA, San Francisco Cinematheque or elsewhere.  When I am finishing up for the day, I leave notes to myself for the next time.

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst?  

The best advice: When you are finishing up in your studio for the day, take notes of where you left off and what you want to do next with your project if it isn’t finished.  This way the next time you return to your studio you don’t have spend as much time toiling with your next steps.  I can’t think of any worst advice.  The only bad thing I can think is assuming that what works for one artist will work for another.

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

I currently have a collage showing as part of  Common Ground: A Celebration of Our National Parks at the David Brower Center in Berkeley, CA.

What are you most looking forward to at Project 387?

Hours of uninterrupted time, getting to meet and converse with artists in a setting other than an art opening, learning about Gualala, CA, its history and environment.

Meet Larsen Husby!

Larsen Husby tells us more about his practice in our third artist interview for the Project 387 2016 season. 

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

I've been using maps in my art for a long time now. I love the way that maps exist between the realms of visual language and written word, and how reading a map is distinct from both of those. So I've been exploring the map as a medium, trying to get viewers to jump between these different types of looking, and by extension to see how many different ways there are of approaching one image, one text, one idea. I want these pieces to be not-maps (that is, not literal navigational tools) but to evoke maps, and cause tension in the viewer as they switch between the parts of the brain used for viewing art and for reading maps. Recently, I've started approaching the same ideas of subjectivity and context from a new direction, without using maps (which is a little daunting for me, but the challenge is why I'm doing it).  I've been experimenting with reflective surfaces, such as mirrors and reflective Mylar, layering them on top of one another, and making images and text which are difficult to see but hard to ignore. It's another way to create tension in looking - are you looking at the reflective surface, or the reflection, or both? 

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

I've been listening to and reading a lot of news and commentary recently. Minnesota Public Radio, podcasts such as Codeswitch and More Perfect, articles from the New York Times and various news blogs. My work as an artist has been completely apolitical, but I'm finding myself more and more interested in the state of our society, and it's starting to creep into my practice. But I also love reading fiction, especially short stories. Jorge Luis Borges, Miranda July, George Saunders, Italo Calvino, John Cheever... There's something immensely satisfying about how much substance a short story can convey through the power of suggestion.They evoke entire worlds through a snapshot. It's what I want to do with my visual art. 

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

I don't really have a typical day in the studio. I work two day jobs with varying schedules, so sometimes I have an entire day to make art and other times I have an hour to jot down some ideas. I don't have a studio, so I work from home, at a large table I built in my dining room, and sometimes also the floor and the dining table too. While I work, I like to have something playing the background, either music or the news or a podcast. I often take breaks to go for a walk through my local park, which is my favorite place in the whole city. 

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst?

Recently I saw an exhibition of work by Lee Kit at the Walker Art Center called 'Hold your breath, dance slowly.' In the exhibition pamphlet, he's quoted as saying "If I can grasp something clearly then there is no need for me to make art. So I prefer to create works about things I don't really understand." What a great way of thinking about art making. Reading that was a huge relief, because it freed me from the idea that to express an idea about something, I must be an expert on it. Just keep asking questions. Also, with that outlook, it seems impossible to run out of inspiration, just as it seems impossible to understand everything. 

I cannot think of the worst advice I've received, probably because I ignored it. 

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

Through the end of summer, I have an installation on view in a storefront window in downtown Minneapolis as part of Made Here, a project which puts Minnesota artists in public spaces. 

Also, the Minneapolis Art Lending Library is an ongoing endeavor of mine. The MALL is a nonprofit which loans out original works of art to the public, free of charge. We have pop-up lending hours four times a year, where the public can browse our collection and take a piece home with them. Our next event is actually July 29th, so I'm missing it to be at Project 387!  

What are you most looking forward to at Project 387?

I'm most excited about having a studio space to myself and no other obligations than art making. My current practice is pretty fragmented, with day jobs and chores and the physical limitations of working from home. So being able to spend two whole weeks making art and thinking about art and talking about art sounds like exactly what I need. Like a vacation, except it's a vacation where I'm going to work.

 

Meet Kelly Lloyd!

In our most recent digital interview, Kelly Lloyd tells us more about what she's been working on and what she hopes to gain from the residency. 

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days? 

I make site-specific installations and am particularly interested in installations that blend into their environment because of their placement. I’m interested in spaces and their rules and how I can question rules by creating something that follows them in form, but complicates their assumed form/content relationships. Also right now I’m thinking a lot about what it means to have an art practice that helps me to facilitate the life that I want to lead, rather than change my life in order to fit the art practice that I want to have. Oscar Wilde said, (I love quotes, and I especially love quotes from people who are often quoted like Oscar Wilde…) “I put all my genius into my life; I put only my talent into my work."

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

I recently realized that I’m an experiential learner, which is one of the reasons I decided to move out of Chicago and to Baltimore. I’m currently working at a service learning summer camp in Baltimore called the Civic Leadership Institute. Now and in the upcoming weeks I’ll be looking at people I’ve never met and places I’ve never seen before. I’m reading the students’ materials, which most recently included an article by Adam Davis, “What We Don’t Talk About When We Don’t Talk About Service,” which calls the “goodness of service into question, and with that… ask[s] why we so rarely ask questions about service.” I’m listening to familiar music being played in rental car waiting room, at the local K-Mart and at the bar down the street, which assures me that I’m making the right decisions.  

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

About a year ago I realized that I didn’t need a studio on a daily/weekly basis. Instead I moved a desk into my bedroom and materials for installations into drawers or into bags and boxes at the foot of my bed. I do most of my thinking on public transportation, most of planning on my computer and most of my assembling in the gallery space itself. A typical day looks like me trying to live a life full of new experiences, friends and good food and local beer interspersed with 30 minute to 2 hour long chunks in between where I send emails, make plans, purchase things off my roommate’s amazon prime account, skim through recent screenshots and notes to myself, check flight prices and collect things in bags and boxes that I then put at the foot of my bed. 

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst? 

The best advice someone gave me about my work was actually given by 3 people. A couple of years ago, in Grad School, I had studio visits with Jerry Saltz, James Elkins and Forrest Nash over the course of 2 days. Jerry Saltz talked about my work in very emotional terms, with the stakes being high with statements like, maybe I don’t know how to make “Art,” maybe I’m not an “Artist.” James Elkins spoke about the options I had ahead of me to make my art better as a series of thought experiments. Forrest Nash asked a lot of questions, and then some more questions, and made it seem like I could solve problems if I got to the heart of the matter with some clarity found through questioning. In that particularly feverish studio visit spell I realized that the way I see my work and how to improve it is just a perspective that can be shifted to suit my current emotional needs and intellectual capacity. The worst advice someone told me was that I was a poet, not a comedian. I thought, fuck that, I’d rather be a mediocre poet and a mediocre comedian, but in that mediocrity get at a more diverse expression of life. 

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

In August I am involved in a couple of group shows, “Front and Center,” at the Hyde Park Art Center and “Habeas Corpus” at the Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art. In January 2017 I’ll have a solo show at Shane Campbell’s Lincoln Park Gallery and in April 2017 I will have a solo show at Corner Gallery, also in Chicago. 

What are you most looking forward to at Project 387?

This is the first time when I’ve gotten the time and space to be able to focus on my work without any swiftly encroaching deadlines or recent baggage to shake off. Plus I’ve never been this far north in California before and I’m deeply excited. 

Meet Lea Sorrentino!

Project 387 recently caught up with Lea Sorrentino to learn more about her work and artistic process. Check out the interview below! 

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

My practice is an auto-ethnographical investigation of my life in pursuit of understanding contemporary American identity and culture. My practice is about calling attention to the constructs of American success and the emotional investments we place in possessions and entertainment to create individuality. Or, in not art speak, I am interested in why we eat too much, spend too much, and cry at reality television.

Right now I am focused on the concept of status. What does it mean to have status, what dictates gaining or holding onto status and how does having it or not change access. I am also interested in understanding how place and time determine or effect the way people perceive other's status. 

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

I think I have spent most of my time these past few months looking at my Facebook feed. That can sound trivial but because of the election season (and overall transparency to contemporary global news) I feel like I have been watching friends from different parts of my life implode on each other. Having a primarily liberal collection of friends on my newsfeed is demonstrating how nuance being "woke" can be and how that can feel overwhelming. 

As far as what I am listening to, mostly podcast like Death, Sex and Money or more recently 2 Dope Queens. I have also just finished reading Dodie Bellamy's When the Sick Rule the World and Daniel Clowes' new comic Patience. Both were good. 

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

I have to admit that my studio life involves a lot of binge watching videos, whether on Netlfix/Hulu, Youtube, Vine, Periscope. I normally need to consume enough content that it inspires me to make my own. From there once I am motivated to make something I spend a decent amount of time researching other artists/people who have anything similar to the concept I have decided on. It is important for me to see the similarities of what others are creating and determine what will be different about the conversation I create. 

I like to dissect and edit my work and I feel like there is no time like the last minute to make effective choices. 

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst?

I think the simplistic answer is "less is more". I used to make large scale installation (and I might again someday who knows) but I was questioned by a mentor if the concepts I was working with really needed to be immersive or is it just because I had the resources at the time. This made me question what I was doing and what did the audience really need in order to understand the dialogue I was trying to develop. His questioning my intentions is how I started making video. 

Another piece of good advice is to not get consumed with rejection. There is nothing objective about art. Often time when I apply to a show, grant, residency if I am not accepted I don't take that as a direct reflection of the work. Most of the time panels are made up of people with specific interests, and those panels revolve. One year a panel could be focused on Social Justice art the next Abstract paintings. You never know who is going to respond positively to your work, so you just have to keep putting yourself out there. It can feel like crude sometimes but if you make yourself vulnerable something eventually works out. 

I can't think of any "bad" advice off the top of my head. I grew up in Jersey and Philly where there is a wealth of people giving you there opinion. Then I moved to the Midwest where it felt like people were often afraid to be direct. Now I am in California where it feels like people are more into being laid back than telling people how to live. 

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

I am pretty excited to be teaching a course for the School of Making Thinking this fall in New York. It is on Cyberformance which I have been super interested in both historically and as a contemporary way to address the diminishing audience of performance art. I also took a little hiatus from a podcast I produce call Lea and the Internet and I am starting that again in July. I have had some really great guest on the show and excited to see who will join me this year. 

What are you most looking forward to at Project 387?

I always look forward to meeting new people and the stimulating conversations that happen during residencies. Since I make the majority of my work digitally, I find that it can be really isolating. Having the opportunity to engage with other artists and get feed back on my ideas is really beneficial for my work and growth (personally and professionally). 

I am pumped to be outside. I grew up and primarily have lived in cities. I didn't know hiking was actually something really fun until moving to San Francisco. Most residencies are set in remote areas and as much as I love being on the computer it is fun to get the mental break of the outdoors. However, I should probably set realistic expectations for all the other residents, as much as I am looking forward to being outside, I still will probably do a hefty amount of searching for wifi.  

About Place- By Sydney Feeney, Project 387 Board Member

I was introduced to Mendocino County once in my late teens and its grandeur and wildness grabbed my imagination while instilled a yearning to belong.  The memory of the coast with its trees and rugged landscape remained firmly in my conscious thought for years. 

In 1990, my husband and I bought 90 acres that was in need of some serious restoration and attention.  It had been logged and, for many years, had served as a community source for shale gravel. There wasn’t even a road that made the property accessible without four wheel drive. We had no idea what we were getting into but we put our heads down and took on the task of learning the multidisciplinary art of owning country property. 

We spent countless days removing underbrush, creating burn piles, remodeling abandoned houses, building barns, a total creek restoration, moving large amounts of dirt to create roads, and then finally paving those roads.  We expanded the original purchase as adjacent properties became available and it will remain its current size, a contiguous 150 acres that stretches from Highway One up our road 1 ½ miles to the top of the property.  There is a creek running through the middle known as Getchell Creek. 

I will say that caretaking this piece of the planet is a fulltime job and you have to love it. But with towering redwoods, ponds, hiking trails, a waterfall, the creek and meadow, and a 180 degree view of the Pacific, this property never ceases to amaze us. We love to share it and for two weeks out of every summer it has become home to Project 387. With the residency drawing on the concept of “Place” this year, Project387’s location is certain to leave a lasting impression on those chosen to attend this summer.

 

Meet Anne Beck!

One week to go! In anticipation of the start of our residency, meet Anne Beck, Fort Bragg based artist and our last to be featured on our blog this season! 

1.     Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

For the past five years my life has been dedicated to Lost Coast Culture Machine, a contemporary art outpost in Fort Bragg, CA focusing on socially engaged & sustainable creative practice. With the close of Lost Coast Culture Machine’s physical space in May, I’m now in the process of reinventing my self & delving back into a studio practice.

Broadly, I seem to be settling into the roles of amateur naturalist, lay surveyor, and naïve assessor & analyst of the current landscape – collecting specimens & recording data, cataloguing that which seems useful, and investigating further that which seems impermeable. This is all in the context of envisioning a sustainable path forward for myself and the planet, which is often a playful exercise in the face of absurd & complex circumstance.

To this end, I’m currently working in three distinct directions & we’ll see what surfaces: 1. A series of interactive quilts intended to provide warmth and direction - riffing off the legend that quilts were used as maps & path markers on the Underground Railroad; 2. A series of books attempting a Rudimentary Understanding of Industry and Manufacturing; and 3. A series of books and work for the wall: LANDLOOKER! A Cursory Survey of Land-Use Traveling from New York to California and Back Again, 2008 – 2015 which I’m excited to pursue at Project 387.

2. What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

Dard Hunter’s Papermaking – The History and Technique of an Ancient Craft.

I’ve just been to the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia where I was studying the History of European & American Papermaking with Timothy Barrett of the University of Iowa Center for the Book and John Bidwell of the Morgan Library in New York. I’ve returned to California with leftover bags of hemp & cotton, flax, and mulberry pulp & renewed inspiration for making work with, on, and of paper, and especially to experiment with the bast fibers from the byproduct of Northern California’s medical cannabis farmers.

Mendocino County’s abundance of alternative, rural & sustainable living skills in renewable energy sources, biodynamic farming, foraging & wildcrafting, herbal medicine and so on and so forth.

For trying to understand the physiology and philosophy of Qi or Chi:

Michio Kushi’s  Introduction to Oriental Diagnosis & Harriet Beinfield and Efrem Korngold’s Between Heaven and Earth, A Guide to Chinese Medicine. 

Elizabeth Kolbert’s The Sixth Extinction on the current wave of extinctions caused by human activity.

The Toxic 100 Air Polluters Index & the Toxic 100 Water Polluters Index from the Political Economy Research Institute at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Colm Toibin’s The South – a woman artist paints the landscape hypotactically – “The valley as though painted from beneath, as though it were a map.”

Maps, Charts, Graphs, Family Trees & other branching structures.

3. What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

Pretty experimental and chaotic at present with many projects happening at once: bouncing between a book binding, cutting and printing pages for another book, deliberating on the next step in a cast paper sculpture (or is it a drawing?), laying out a quilt, long periods of research, a walk in the woods or on the beach.

4. What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

The best advice: Not to undermine all the people that have given me little tidbits of inspiration & advice, but I think I’m still waiting for the best.

The worst advice: a critique in grad school where the professor began saying that I knew nothing about art and ended saying my work was so ‘felt’ that it was better than Beuys.

5. Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

I’m participating in the Governors Island Art Fair in New York this September with Art Shape Mammoth, and am looking forward to more beyond.

6. Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

Sustained studio time in a creative atmosphere & good conversation. Maybe the best advice about my work.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Miguel Arzabe!

The countdown begins! We are just two weeks away from the start of Project 387. Learn more about Miguel Arzabe who will be joining us on the 2nd.

1. Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

My work considers notions of use-value, agency, subjectivity, and goal oriented thinking. The time I spend hiking in nature has got me thinking about the ongoing drought as stemming from larger existential and philosophical problems. I've been collecting water from different locales, using it to create and release large soap bubbles into the landscape. Their unpredictable trajectories are captured on video. The bubble interests me because it is shiny and captivating - it inspires wonder in young and old alike- yet has critical potential. Its inherent formal qualities such as reflectance, transparency, buoyancy, mutability, and ephemerality give it metaphoric power. Thus in a playfully absurd manner it calls into question how we assign value to one of our most precious of natural resources.

2. What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

I listen KALX, UC Berkeley's radio station, when I am in the studio. The type of music depends on the DJ and it expands my musical horizons. Sometimes I'll put on old records, Newyorican salsa, Cuban son, Argentine sambas, Bolivian music, soul, psychedelic rock. 

Some of the books I am reading/have read are Cadillac desert : the American West and its disappearing water by Marc Reisner, Undermining by Lucy Lippard, Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace, How to Do Things with Art – The Meaning of Art’s Performativity  by Dorothea von Hantelmann, Willing Slaves of Capital : Spinoza and Marx on Desire by Frédéric Lordon, and Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolaño.

3. What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

When I'm filming, it usually is a whole day or multiple day affair. I roam around the landscape looking for the ideal conditions that might yield a successful shoot. Lots of trial and error, physically and mentally exhausting but very fulfilling to be outside all day.

During typical studio days, in the mornings I read and attend to mundane internet activities. Lately I spend the afternoons making a large paper weaving. It's made from flyers, posters, and other paper ephemera collected from art exhibitions, cut into strips and woven by hand. It's a repetitive and meditative kind of work, I can easily forget to stop to eat or drink water. When the evening light hits sometimes I'll go outside and make some bubbles.

4. What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

One of my mentors taught me that there always needs to be room for doubt in the work. Since then it has been a gradual process of letting go of control, letting the work make the decisions.

Bad advice usually comes from someone who is not listening very well.

5. Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?
Recently I created a website where the public can sign up to come along on hikes with a visiting artist. The next walk will happen in September, check www.arthike.com for updates.

6. Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?
I'm excited to meet this group of talented people and to spend my days wandering the landscape. And eating good food!

 

Meet Sarah Ladipo Manyika!

Learn more about Sarah's work and process in her digital interview below. Come talk to her in person and see what she has been up to at our Open House on August 15th!

1. Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

I’m in the process of completing a novella that is, amongst other things, about loneliness, displacement and one woman's determination not to give up hope. I was hoping that my next project would be lighter in tone, but “race” in America has raised its ugly head in very visible ways recently, which has drawn me back to writing about race. This time round I find myself thinking about what makes it so difficult to talk about this topic, what are the barriers to empathy, and what are the global threads that link the racialized experiences in America to the racialized experiences of people around the world. And so it is that with my next project I am traversing the multiple cultures and nations in which I have lived and traveled, from Africa to Europe and America. I grew up in Northern Nigeria (now home to Boko Haram) and studied at universities in England and France (home to increasingly virulent anti-immigrant sentiment). I currently live in America where I am raising my teenage African American son in the context of a land still struggling, deeply, with its racist past. These disparate threads of my personal narrative are, for the first time, coming together in the form of short, audio stories.

2. What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

There is an experimental element in much of what I’m currently reading, watching and listening to which both inspires me and gives me added courage to experiment with content and form in my own work.

- Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant, which I’ve just finished, has me thinking about the nature of memory and forgetfulness on the individual and national level.

- Kendrick Lamar’s album “To Pimp A Butterfly” which I re-listen to just has me thinking. Period.

- Bernardine Evaristo’s Mr. Loverman, which I’ve just begun, has me laughing and crying, and delighting in the sweetness of the English language that comes from multiple global infusions.

- Anna Deavere Smith’s “Notes from the Field, Doing Time in Education. The California Chapter,” is what I’m most looking forward to seeing/experiencing in the next few weeks.

3. What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

I don’t have a typical day, but an ideal day is one in which I spend several productive hours writing, and several more reading.

4. What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

Good advice abounds, the difficulty for me is adhering to it, but here are two wise thoughts that I’d like to do a better job of remembering.

From Marilynne Robinson:

“We experience pain and difficulty as failure instead of saying, I will pass through this, everyone I have ever admired has passed through this, music has come out of this, literature has come out of it. We should think of our humanity as a privilege.” 

(From The Paris Review Interview with Sarah Fay. The Art of Fiction No. 198)

From a Yoruba saying that speaks to me of the need for balance and moderation, between giving too much of one’s self and too little.

Eni to ba dun ladunju, lila laa nlaa tan; eyi to ba koro pupoju, oun la ntu danu

Roughly translated, “The too sweet ones, are the ones we lick to its end; the bitter ones we spit out.”

5. Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

I will be participating in a couple of this year’s Litquake events (the Bay Area’s Literary Festival). This will include an “in conversation” event at the Museum of the African Diaspora with author, Chris Abani (October 11th) and a reading with the HAZEL Reading Series at Litquake’s Litcrawl (October 17th)

6. Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

Time. Time to write and to interact with fellow artists. What an incredible gift this is. Thank you Project 387!

Meet Devin Symons

Devin gave us a glimpse into his creative world from DC. Read on to learn more!

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

I am working on a collection of stories, all set in unusual places and dealing with themes of wilderness, journey, loss, absurdity, hunger, belief, and the fantastic. Some of the stories could take place in a reality recognizable as our own, others in a liminal place curved by imagination.

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

The desert is all around me now, so that is what I hear and see and take in each morning. I’m reading the Collected Fictions of Jorge Luis Borges, and I’m drawing on his ability to combine the mythic, the historical, and the surreal into a fiction that breathes, that feels alive. Spread out around me are Department of Speculation by Jenny Offill, Redeployment by Phil Klay, Tenth of December by George Saunders, Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen Russell, and The Illustrated Guide to Cacti.

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

Wake early. Hike, climb, soak, or swim. Make coffee. Read. Write. Cook. Eat. Read. Write. Cook. Talk and drink with friends, lie down outside, watch the stars. Read. Sleep. Repeat.

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst?

I’ve been luck enough to have received mostly good advice.

-       Read everything you can get your hands on.

-       In your own writing, find the heat. When you do, keep pushing at those points, beyond where you feel comfortable and safe. The best writing will come from that place.

-       It takes a while before ability catches up with taste. Keep writing and eventually you’ll get to the good stuff.


I also like what Neil Gaiman says: “Remember that, sooner or later, before it ever reaches perfection, you will have to let it go and move on and start to write the next thing. Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.”

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

As part of my current residency in Joshua Tree, I’ll participate in an artist talk in June, and then a joint show/reading in July.

Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

Meeting amazing new people in a beautiful place of personal signficance.

 

 

Meet Alison Stigora!

In our second digital interview of the season, Alison Stigora answered a few questions about her practice and upcoming work at Project 387. Read on! 

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

I am very interested in how our experiences of landscape and architecture affect our sense of scale. I have been looking at how light interacts with transparent materials and can transform our perception of a space. The theme of transparency- in terms of what we choose to reveal or conceal from one another- is something I've been exploring for awhile.

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

At the moment I'm temporarily living in Joshua Tree, CA, which is an incredible expansive desert environment. I'm finding that the rock forms I'm seeing here are influencing my work quite a bit. The raw quality of the landscape and the intense light here are directing me towards some new materials. I've been looking at work by Andrea Zittel, James Turrell, a handful of architects, and the assemblage work of Noah Purifoy.

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

I'm a night owl, so I tend to start later and work later. I usually work on sculpture and drawing projects simultaneously. When I enter the studio I spend time just looking at what was last completed before launching into anything. I try to pay attention to what I'm seeing and respond to that. Sometimes I'll start with drawing; then get into the heavier sculpture work. The drawing often leads me to understand what needs to be built next.

What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

The best advice was, you know what your work needs better than anyone else. Create what you want to see in the world. Also, manifest your ideas-- get them out into a physical form one way or another. Don't just keep it in your head.

I try to forget the bad advice. 

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

I will be having an outdoor installation and gallery opening in Joshua Tree, CA on July 11th. I'm also part of an artist-architect collaborative team that will have a large-scale outdoor installation opening in Philadelphia, PA this October.

Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

I'm looking forward to experiencing a new environment with great people and creating work in response.

 

 

Meet Amy M. Ho!

Project 387 recently caught up with Amy M. Ho to learn a little more about what she has been up to and what she will be working on this August. Read on to learn more!

Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. What are some of the themes you are exploring these days?

My work deals with our physical and emotional relationships to space.  All our senses come to us through space yet we often take it for granted.  Recently, I have been thinking a lot about memory and space and the way places from our past become tangled with emotions from the present.  I have been exploring themes of space and memory with a group of artists from San Quentin State Prison and their perspectives have given me new respect for the way our memories of places can remain forever as ideas of refuge and hope. 

What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

Right now I am reading John Miller’s book on Mike Kelley’s “Educational Complex”. The book walks the reader through the development of the project and through Mike Kelley’s exploration of the role of schools as institutions and spaces in his personal history.  In regard to what I have been looking at lately, last weekend I saw a wonderful show by Leo Saul Berk at the Frye Museum in Seattle.  The exhibition centered on his memories of the house he grew up living in.  What I found most interesting about his work was how he translated his experiences of the architecture into concrete sculptures and forms.  I am also currently reading Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Return of Sherlock Holmes”.  Its wonderful to get lost in a mystery story every once in a while!

What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

I split my time between working on the computer editing images and video at home and creating models and testing projections at the studio.  When I work at home, I like to break up the day by sitting out in the back yard with the cats.  When I’m at studio, I sprinkle the day with conversations and visits with my studio mates. 

What's the best advice someone has given you about your work? The worst?

The best advice that I’ve ever gotten was to find my own balance and rhythm in my practice and process.  The worst advice was to give up because artists don't make any money! 

Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

I currently have a show in the project space at San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art.  The show will be up until September 12th.  Also, my studio space, Real Time and Space, will be having a fundraiser and open studios on July 25th from noon to 5pm. 

 Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

I’m very much looking forward to some dedicated studio time!  I’ve had so many ideas swimming around in my head, waiting to take physical form!  I’m very grateful to Project 387 for giving me some studio time to be excited about!

 

 

Meet Joseph Becker

The countdown begins! We are heartbeats away from the launch of Project 387 season two. Here is the final interview we did with our upcoming residents. Meet Joseph Becker and learn what he will be working on while up in Gualala for two weeks!

P387: Tell us briefly about the focus of your work.

JB: I’ll be working on a research project focusing on the architecture and landscape architecture of Sea Ranch, and the contextual history of design in Northern California during the 1960s. I am interested in exploring the history and conditions of Sea Ranch, looking specifically at the intersection of site, place, landscape, climate, design strategy, and the “slow-growth” integration of a large-scale development with some of the most gorgeous coastline in the world.

P387: What themes are you currently exploring?

JB: I’m investigating and researching the Sea Ranch origins, development, design guidelines, and philosophy, and how Lawrence Halprin’s role as Landscape Architect, and MLTW and Esherick’s roles as architects, inform Northern California Regionalism and act as a crux of what some refer to as the Third Bay Tradition architecture style. I’m interested in how the Sea Ranch project fits into a larger bay area history.

P387: What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

 JB: I’m in the process of assembling a pile of research material – I think the main influence will come from being in the place!

P387: What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

JB: During a research phase of a project my office is typically a pile of relevant books and documents that are in various states of being read, reread, and unread. If given an opportunity to avoid the day to day operations as a curator at SFMOMA, I tend to wake up early with a good cup of coffee, read a bit, break for some food, and repeat as necessary.

P387: Is there anything unusual that helps you stay focused while working?

JB: I default to Philip Glass and good coffee.

P387: What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

 JB: As a curator the advice you receive is very different from the advice you receive as a studio artist. I think the best exhibitions are formed from engaging directly with the material or topic, and so the most important advice you can receive is really just listening to any and all parties that have been involved in the history of the work.

P387: Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

JB: Most of our “upcoming” things aren’t until 2016 when the museum reopens!

P387:  Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

JB: Fresh air and the beautiful Northern California coastline. It’s exactly what drove the Sea Ranch project in the first place.

 

Thanks Joseph! Here is a glimpse at the landscape that inspired the Sea Ranch. 

Thanks Joseph! Here is a glimpse at the landscape that inspired the Sea Ranch. 

Meet Kristina Larsen and Sebastian Martin

This year we have a collaborative team coming to Project 387. Read on to learn more about what Kristina Larsen and Sebastian Martin will be up to in August. 

P387: Tell us briefly about the focus of your work. 

We are trying to make tools which bridge -- or at least exist within -- the space between a person and the environment, and which help you to see or allow you to interact with the things around you in a different way. We seek multiple entry points into what is already there. We create objects and experiences which inform and reflect people’s understanding of the world. The things we make are the products of our own investigations into properties and characteristics, whether of materials or phenomena; wood and clay or the ocean and shadows.

P387: What themes are you currently exploring?

Relationships between people and their environment. Methods and processes of understanding the world. Inquiry. How to inspire people to act without giving them instructions to do a very specific thing. How people collect evidence and how they make sense of things, or how they don’t make sense of things. Maybe you experience something but you don’t ever make sense of it. 

Special places. Both places made by people and those made through natural processes. What makes a place special? How do you perceive that, how do you decide that? What are the qualities or the feelings that add up to specialness? 

Visualization. How to translate something into an object or arrangement or sculpture that then reflects a finding. How to express things like variety, uniformness, smoothness, connectedness, disruption, etc. 

P387: What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

 Our process is currently highly influenced by the tools and techniques we’ve accessed through our residency at Autodesk’s Pier 9 workshop. We have been inspired by by our recent travels together, including Marcel Wanders’ survey at Stedelijk in Amsterdam, and separately, to the places mentioned below. Also, World Cup soccer.

S: The former outdoor Bar 25 on the grounds of the Holzmarkt. The area is now an ‘undefined place’ in Berlin, that people call “The Pampa”. “Pampa” is used colloquially in German to describe a place where there is nothing, a vast plane.

There are preconceived ideas of what you can do or can’t do for about every place in a city, but not for the Pampa. It made me think about how every environment changes us and our behaviour, even when we are exposed to it for a very short time.

K: Roni Horn’s Vatnasafn/Library of Water. I visited it while in Iceland and since then have been reading anything I can find about her decades-long body of work engaging with the island and its inhabitants. I’m also poring over Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison’s The Serpentine Lattice exhibition catalog.

P387: What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

We’re always working on many projects at once. We start by talking about what we want to make and set a course for the day, kind of roughing out a plan for the time we have. We give ourselves tasks. Often K makes drawings, S plays with materials, we work independently for a while and come back together. We work pretty differently but it’s very complimentary.

S: I do something physical for a while and then walk away and do another thing, like find and experiment with materials or do some research. My mind wanders. It’s like the way kids play, jumping away and coming back, not finishing things. I’ll start with something small, with a few pieces of material, and making that little thing will get me to what I need to do next. Maybe that leads to some place where we have to make a bigger decision about how to continue.

K: I begin with a task where I know what I want to do or have a specific question to answer and go from there. I am slow to change modes, so once I’m doing something involved like making a drawing or something I get way into it and it’s hard to switch to something else. When I reach a place where I’m uncertain or stuck, we get together and talk things through and adapt the plan to accommodate whatever discoveries we’ve made. At the end of the day I like to talk through everything that we accomplished, which is especially important when many of those things are intangible.

P387: Is there anything unusual that helps you stay focused while working?

S: Walking. Changing locations or work spaces, taking small breaks. Doing something to shake up my thoughts. Like constantly pinching myself.

K: Talking to myself.

 P387: What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

 Best: Do what you love. Worst: Do what you’re good at.

P387: Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

Right now we’re part way through our Autodesk residency at Pier 9. As part of the Exploratorium’s Bay Observatory project we’re collaborating with professors at CCA on a class for this fall, which will be focused on designing resiliency. One of the products will be an exhibition of artifacts created by the students as part of their design process. S will be leading some teacher training workshops in Costa Rica at the end of August.

P387: Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

S: Waking up next to the project that we work on and having that be the very first thing that I do in the day. No bus riding or email checking before I start to work.

 K: Having full consecutive days to spend completely immersed in the project, and not having to switch out of that mode.

 

Thanks Kristina and Sebastian! Here is a glimpse at some of the early Project 387 garden harvest. We'll be dining off some of this bounty in August. 

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Meet Masako Miki

Masako Miki took some time to answer a few questions about her practice and upcoming stay at Project 387. Read on to learn more!

p387: Tell us briefly about the focus of your work.

MM: I am interested in creating a narrative concerning dilemmas, dichotomies, and metamorphosis. These psychological states continue to shift in processes of adaptation. The animal motif and their behaviors are used as a metaphor for the human psyche.  The narratives provide characters the viewer can relate to; in a similar way mythologies reveal our unique attribute of empathy. The fictitious context seems to invite more honest responses. 

The adaptation/evolution processes imply the enigmatic, and an almost magical quality in us, which makes me wonder about things beyond our perception.  I want to create a narrative where boundaries are lifted so our perceptions continue to expand from here.

 p387: What themes are you currently exploring?

 MM: My current themes are sperm whales, and cave paintings. I am exploring different formats to show my drawings, including performance and film.  Other recent motifs are mask, moons, lanterns, and fabric. 

p387: What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

MM: Right now I am researching sperm whales. I just finished reading Blink by Malcolm Gladwell.  Other readings are Mythologies by Roland Barthes, and The Social Conquest of Earth by Edward O. Wilson.  I recently got a collection on Japanese mythology, and am reading about Shintoism again.

p387: What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

MM: A typical day in my studio starts with emails and research before I physically begin work. I work on several pieces simultaneously. Often my time is split between the actual work, and running errands to prep for the work.  Sometimes I’ll stay in my studio all day and night.

p387: Is there anything unusual that helps you stay focused while working?

MM: Usually, podcasts, music or the radio is on when I am in the studio. I’ve been keeping my art journals close by.  They are pocket size moleskin notebooks.  Ideas, sketches, quotes, notes, and scraps are kept here- very raw materials about my thoughts.      

p387: What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

MM: The first is to be honest about what you want to make. That is the only thing it really matters. The worst is not to follow this. 

p387: Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

MM: I am in a group show “Survival Adaptations” at Adobe Books Backroom Gallery in San Francisco. The exhibition dates are July 12-August 9.  Also my piece is included in Artist’s Survival Guide Chapbook, which will be available at the gallery.  In August I am going to Kamiyama Artist in Residence in Tokushima, Japan. The residency runs until November 6th. I will return to the Bay Area at the end of this year. 

p387: Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

MM: I am looking forward to interacting with other artists and being inspired by the place!

Here's a sneak peak of the view from the Hill House. We're hoping for weather like this in August!

Here's a sneak peak of the view from the Hill House. We're hoping for weather like this in August!

Meet Christy Chan

Meet Christy Chan! She will be joining this summer to finalize the screenplay for her upcoming film. Learn more about her work and process below! 

p387: Tell us briefly about the focus of your work.

CC: I’m interested in storytelling as a form of communion and the fact that no two people share a reality.   Everything funny, good, bad, weird, and wonderful, I feel, comes from people trying to impose their realities on each other.  

p387: What themes are you currently exploring?

CC: The urge to connect, race, class, empathy, love, hate, spirituality.

p387: What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

CC: I recently started reading Buddha Mind, a book about how conceptual art has been influenced by Buddhist thinking and principles of impermanence.  I have had a meditation practice for a while and have noticed its effect on my art process, in the sense that it gives me a safety to flow with my thoughts. So it’s been interesting to read about how some of my heroes have been affected long-term by Zen Buddhism practices.  It’s helping me connect the dots on why certain habits are working vs. not working.   

p387: What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

CC: I  usually get to the studio by 9 and work until 2.

p387: Is there anything unusual that helps you stay focused while working?

CC: It’s probably not unusual, but a quiet white box for a studio, where I can shut out the world.  I also have a beat up shoebox called the distractions box.  If I’m feeling stuck in a tape deck of my own thoughts, I try to write about it and then I stick the note in that box. 

p387: What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

CC: An instructor from film school said stop thinking so much and just feel the work.  , He also frequently quoted a Pedro Almodovar line “Let your mistakes become your style.”

I try not to remember the bad advice. 

p387: Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

CC: I have some work in a one night happening on July 4th called “Talkies” in San Francisco.

p387: Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

CC: I’m really looking forward to meeting everyone and hugging some beautiful trees.  

Thanks Christy! We are looking forward to meeting you too!


Meet Cybele Lyle

Interested in learning more about Cybele Lyle and the work she plans to explore at Project 387? Read our interview with her below!

p387: Tell us briefly about the focus of your work.

 Cybele: I’m interested in transforming the architecture and natural environment around me into a new space - one to meet my own personal needs and narrative. I think of structures and place the way I think of text – as something that is edit-able/re-written by the reader to create the story one sees, needs and wants. I want to break down the structures around me and rebuild them into something emotionally safe to inhabit.

p387: What themes are you currently exploring?

Cybele: Architecture, the moon, color, materiality, shadows and the unknown

p387: What are you looking at, reading, or listening to right now that is influencing your work or process?

Cybele: I recently acquired a kindle with someone else’s books on it. So I’m slowly making my way through those. Mostly science fiction. I don’t know which is influencing which – if my life is influencing what I’m reading, if what I’m reading is influencing my work, and/or if my work is influencing my life – but I know influence is happening.

p387: What does a typical day in the studio/office look like for you?

 Cybele: It depends on the day, week and month. Often, it’s a lot of rearranging the furniture and my work and the places to make and think. But my music is almost always on. Lately it’s sitting and thinking, writing and moving things around.

p387: Is there anything unusual that helps you stay focused while working?

Cybele: To stay focused, I close the doors and try to shut-out the outside world, and if possible, my thoughts. Music helps. But I don’t think any of that is unusual.

p387: What's the best advice someone has giving you about your work? The worst?

 Cybele: Best advice has been to try to let go of reason and the worst has been to get more technical.

p387: Are you involved in any upcoming shows/events/happenings?

Cybele: I am in two shows that are currently up. I’m in great company at a show at Kala in Berkeley called “Para-Apparatus” that is up til the end of July. And I have a solo show called “The Moon is Slowly Rising” at Et al. Gallery in San Francisco. It’s up through the first week in July. 

p387: Is there one particular thing you are most looking forward to at Project 387?

Cybele: Exploring the coast and the forest!

 

Thanks Cybele! Here is a sneak peak at the forest for you!